Cary win 50 UV- Spectrophotometer

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Specifications

Model no: Cary win 50

Monochromator: Czerny-Turner

Beam splitting system: Beam splitter

Detectors: 2 silicon diode detectors

UV-Vis limiting resolution (nm): ≤ 1.5 nm

Wavelength range (nm): 190–1100 nm

Wavelength accuracy (nm): ± 0.5 at 541.94

The Cary Win 50

spectrophotometerThe principles of spectroscopic analysis rely on passing light of a known wavelength through a sample and measuring how much of the light is absorbed. (An alternative to this is to measure how much light is reflected.) A spectrophotometer must therefore be able to generate discrete wavelengths of light, pass these through a sample and measure the absorption that has occurred.

Cary 50 Design

The Cary 50 features a unique design that uses a Xenon flash lamp as the source of UV-Vis radiation. This offers many advantages over traditional and diode array UV-Vis spectrophotometers.

The ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer is an instrument commonly used in the laboratory that analyzes compounds in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible (Vis) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The principles of spectroscopic analysis rely on passing light of a known wavelength through a sample and measuring how much of the light is absorbed. Unlike infrared spectroscopy (which looks at vibrational motions), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy looks at electronic transitions. It allows one to determine the wavelength and maximum absorbance of compounds. From the absorbance information and using a relationship known as Beer’s Law (A = εbc, where A = absorbance, ε = molar extinction coefficient, b = path length, and c = concentration), one is able to determine either the concentration of a sample if the molar extinction coefficient is known, or the molar absorbtivity, if the concentration is known. Molar extinction coefficients are specific to particular compounds, therefore UV-Vis spectroscopy can aid one in determining an unknown compound’s identity. Furthermore, the energy of a compound can be ascertained from this technology by using the equation E = hc/λ (where E = energy, h = Planck’s constant, c = speed of light, and λ = wavelength). Since photons travel at the speed of light, and h and c are constants, one can find the energy.

Cary 50 features include:

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